Study Guide for Nineteen Eighty-Four (Michael Radford, 1984)

1. Examine the images in the archive footage shown in the opening moments of the film and discuss how these images prepare the audience for the story. How does the film present the people who watch the footage at the very beginning of the film?
2. Examine the following settings in the film and discuss how they all contribute to our understanding of the issues the film is dealing with: Winston’s apartment, Winston’s office, the cafeteria.
3. What do you think about the physical features of Winston? What could they signify?
4. Where does Winston work? What does his job involve? What is the significance of this in the story?
5. What is the significance of Winston’s diary? Why does he describe himself as a dead man in the early moments of the film?
6. Comment on the following quotes in relation to the concept of Newspeak: a) “It’s a beautiful thing, the destruction of words”. b) “Doubleplus good.”
7. What is the significance of the Chestnut Tree Café in the film?

8. Who is Mr. Charrington? What does his antique shop mean to Winston?
9. What is the significance of Winston’s dream?
10. Comment on the Party’s perception of children in relation to the children’s song heard during Winston’s train journey before he met Julia: “We are the children / Builders of the future / And we the children swear to thee / Loyal emotion, fearless devotion / And to die with dignity”
11. What does the Golden Country where Winston and Julia secretly meet represent in the film? How does it differ from the earlier settings in the film?
12. Comment on Winston’s following words: “I hate purity. I hate goodness. I don’t want virtue to exist anywhere. I want everyone corrupt.”
13. Comment on the following quote from the film: “Freedom is the freedom to say two plus two equals four.”

14. What do Big Brother, O’Brien and Goldstein stand for in the story?
15. What is the function and significance of the Ministry of Love in the film? What is the significance of Room 101?
16. What are the definitions of “loyalty” and “betrayal” in the film? Identify quotes from the film and discuss these two concepts.
17. Identify the ways the media is used in Oceania and discuss its role. Can you think of any cases where mass media have been used in similar ways? Discuss when, where and how.
18. Study the concepts of “utopia” and “dystopia” and discuss Orwell’s vision of the future in relation to these two concepts.
19. Identify what “satire” means and in what ways “Nineteen Eighty-Four” can be called a satirical film.
20. Michael Bradford’s film is based on George Orwell’s novel. What message(s) do you think Orwell wanted to convey through such a novel?

8 Responses to “1984 – Study Questions”
  1. Andrew G says:

    1) The opening scene sets the mood for the movie very well. The scene of a very large group of people, with emotions running high worshipping the picture on the wall, and as a whole group showing an unimaginable hate to the man on the screen. The strange actions the people make with their hands crossed above their heads, the hate that is boiling up inside them, and the look of absolute adoration for Big Brother (who is just a picture), make the audience of the movie realise that these people are different, and gives you the impression that they have been completely changed. It is a feeling of culture shock that the audience gets.
    2) Everything in the city is grey, had has a look of oppression. The streets are filled with litter, the walls are grotty and the buildings are falling apart. Winston flat feels like a gaol. It is one square room with only a very basic bed, and few other facilities. A large ‘telescreen’ on the wall meant that he had no privacy in his flat. His whole life was controlled.
    3) Winston is tall, but has not aged well, and has a serious cough and a bit of a hunch. It looks as though life is wearing him down. It may be the oppressive environment, or the relentless control from the party, or else the party’s policies are bad on his health. In any case, his withered body shows the oppressive nature of the party.
    4) Winston is a member of the outer party, or a low ranking bureaucrat, working in the ministry of truth. His job was to doctor documents that were not in agreement with the part doctrine. Un-persons must be scrubbed from history and incorrect predictions must be revised closer to the actual figure. The text is deeply ironic. Here, there is a feeling of a deep paradox. He is a party member who is against the party and its doctrine, and wants to see the rise in freedom and the fall of big brother and the activities in which he was participating.
    5) Winston’s diary is his only opportunity to express whatever he thinks. At all other times he is under the watch of spies from the party, in view of the telescreens or so afraid to even show a facial expression that may give his feelings away. The diary allows him to express his feelings, but also gives him an opportunity for freedom that he does not receive at any other time.
    6) A) In our world today, words, especially as part of literature, are generally viewed as a beautiful thing, or at least used to create a beautiful thing. In this world, words are used to achieve a political purpose, for which purpose the destruction of words is a necessary thing. If you follow the party, then the destruction of words is a beautiful thing. It moves you closer to your goal.
    B) Doubleplusgood is supposed to be an invention that simplifies the language. It does show though how eager the party is control everything in the world, and make everything uniform. A never ending words like ‘fantastic’, ‘wonderful’, ‘excellent’ are more difficult for the party to control, that one simply set of words – good, plusgood and doubleplusgood. Similarly the invention of ‘ungood’ to replace bad shows the parties aim to reduce the ease with which to critisise anything. Things are not bad, they are simply less good.
    7) The chestnut tree obviously holds some meaning. At the start of the film, Winston looks in through the window, and sees someone who is confessing his crimes as a thought criminal on the telescreen as he is sitting there. At the end of the film after being denounced as a thought criminal, Winston finds himself sitting in the Chestnut café. Perhaps it is a favourite haunt for thought criminal (reformed), or perhaps it is a place for the party to put thought criminals up to public view, to name and shame them.
    8) The antique dealer is a proletariat, someone who Winston is not supposed to associate with. For Winston, while he goes searching for razors, he finds comfort in the shop. In many ways it is a blast from his past, and is an escape from the harsh realities of the world he lives in.
    9) Winston’s dreams show his lack of love Big Brother and the world he lives in. As Winston said, you can never be quite sure what you say in your sleep. It’s something you don’t have much control over. Winston’s dream is another way the reader accesses his mind in order to assess where his heart is. It is in an open green field on a beautiful day, often with Julia. This is an image of freedom, and shows Winston’s yearning for it. His visions of this place were strong while he was in the ministry of love.
    10) Children are a new opportunity to direct the society in their direction. Children offer a black canvas where the part is able to implant their vision for the future. The implant it on ‘the builders of the future’. The song also teaches boundless devotion to the party and its ways.
    11) The ‘Golden Country’ is an area that does not come under the enforced control of the party. It is an escape, where Winston is free to chose the things that he does. All scenes in the movie (except for the dream) are of extremely run down urban settings, or grey deteriorating insides of buildings. The Golden country resembles very closely Winston’s dream.
    12) These are strong words of defiance against the party. The pure people in the story are those who abide by the ways of the party. Winston is tired of an ending purity and virtue around him. He wants some freedom to choose what he does.
    13) Two plus two equals four is a simple maths problem that is symbolic for absolute truth. It is a symbol for an infallible truth that the party does not believe in. Truth varies on what you believe according to the party – and more specifically, it depends on what the party believes. This is another way that the arty is able to gain absolute control of the people.
    14) Big Brother is the dictator. He is a symbol of absolute power. O’Brien is the enforcer. He is a very irksome man with a deep love of deep brother. He shows the how irsome it is to follow big brother. Goldstein is propaganda material. He is ridiculed, and is used by the party to gain popularity after spreading rumours about him – rumours that the people believe.
    15) The ministry of love is where love for big brother is manufactured, or in other words where ordinary people are tortured. The name for the ministry is deeply ironic. It is shrouded in secrecy. Most people don’t know of the terrors that go in the place, and those who do dare not speak of it. Room 101 is the ultimate blackmail. It is made out the most terrifying thing, and the workers at the ministry guarantee that this is the case. They choose punishments that reflect the subjects worst fears. It change peoples’ opinion of Big Brother it is so horrific.
    16) Loyalty and betrayal are relative terms. While for Winston is loyal to what he believes, he betrays the party. A major betrayal comes about when he is being tortured, and implicated Julia. Loyalty to the party is shown in Paron’s and his family. They are absolutely loyal to the Party’s ideals.
    17) The media in Oceania is state owned and is inescapable. Telescreens, where media programs are shown, are located throughout the city, including in the cafeteria and people apartments. It is all about spreading propoganda. It presents facts and figures that increase support for the government. Regular announcements about wins on the war front, and amazing figures about how many of a certain item or commodity had been produced, always made up, boosted people’s agreement in the party, and ultimately love for Big Brother. It also transmits confections of thought criminals. It is a scare tactic. Often political parties or organizations with political interests in our world will spit out propaganda- and often we don’t know that we are receiving it.
    18) Utopia looks at a perfect world – an ideal place where people are perfectly happy. Utopia looks at an oppressive society. Orwell’s society is very oppressive. The government has amazing control, and over time is increasing its power. Some people believe that increased governmental control will lead to improvements in society. Orwell is warning what happens when it goes too far and the government gains total control even of ‘the few inches inside my skull’.
    19) Satire is a use of irony, exaggeration, humour and ridicule to point out vices. The novel is deeply ironic, and the society is somewhat exaggerated, but it makes a very clear point about the dangers of an over controlling government.
    20) George Orwell was writing in a period after world war two, when one of the worlds two superpowers was under a communist government. Orwells novel is an exposé of this type of government, the rule they impose on the people, and the effects that has on society.

  2. Sam Bullen says:

    1984 Questions

    1. In the opening scene the people are portrayed as loyal supporters to “Big Brother” who is there leader. There is some clever imagery to show the distribution of power with the leader shown on a big screen looking down at the people. They raise their arms in respect to their leader.
    2. Winston lives in a typical sparse apartment. There is no natural world in his apartment and it grey, boring and disgusting. His office is identical to everyone else’s and is small and boring. The cafeteria is the same, there is no natural world and it is grey and boring. It deals with the issue of living in a grey world that is identical to everyone else’s
    3. His physical features are that he is wrinkly and old. This could signify that he is weak and stressed.
    4. Winston works in the ministry of truth editing old newspapers so that they support the government. It is ironic because he works in the ministry of truth and his job is to change newspapers to tell lies. This is significant because it illustrates the government control over the media.
    5. Winston’s diary is significant because it is his only outlet where he can be himself from controlled world he lives in.
    6. These quotes show how “Big Brother” has got rid of words to get rid of ideas. For example things are referred to as good or ungood. This gets rid of the word bad and the idea of something being bad.
    7. The chestnut tree café is where Winston sees people confessing on the screen and they are there in real life. The screen is supposed to be live and this shows Winston that there is more lies coming from Big Brother
    8. Mr Charrington is the owner of the antique shop. The shop is important to Winston because he buys his diary from the antique shop. Him and Julie also use the room in the back as a meeting place away from prying eyes.
    9. Winston’s dream is significant because it shows that it is human nature to be selfish. He steals the last bit of food from his sister and mother and runs away. When he returns they are gone and there are rats everywhere, which is the reason for his great fear of rats.
    10.They perceive children as the future workers. They are “brainwashed” with party values and expectations from a young age so that they turn out as obedient citizens
    11.In the golden country where Winston and Julia meet it is very beautiful and there is nature everywhere. Earlier settings are devoid of nature and are grey and plain.
    12. When Winston says, “I hate purity” it means that he is a realist and believes that the party is trying to live in a Utopia and he believes this is wrong because all humans are corrupt able. He believes that humans are innately bad and there is no stopping that.
    13. This quote says that “freedom is the freedom to say two plus two equals four”. This means that humans should be allowed to follow their own logical thought and there should be no one there telling them what to do/think.
    14. Big Brother is the leader of the party and is always watching wherever you go. Goldstien was the leader of the brotherhood, which was an organization working against the party however he was eventually captured. O’Brien is the man who pretends to be part of the brotherhood to trap Winston and July. He then goes on to torture Winston
    15. The ministry of love “cures” people who are rebellious to the party. So they torture people until they submit and say the love big brother and actually mean it. In room 101 they make their patients face their worse fear so that they crack their spirit. This is so that they can put them back into the workforce as obedient members of the party
    16. Loyalty and betrayal are major themes in the book. To be loyal to the party you must be faithful and devoted to the party. While betrayal is when you are disloyal to someone and betray there trust. Examples of this in the film are when Winston and Julia swear to be loyal to each other and they both end up betraying one another.
    17. The media is always there telling people what to do or announcing something. Everywhere in the movie there is a screen where the media can relay propaganda to people. During the world wars similar media techniques were used, propaganda was used extensively to try and recruit soldiers.
    18. Orwell believes that by trying to create a Utopia you always end up with a dystopia. This is because of mans innate evil. Orwell believes that in the future we will live in a dystopia because of the amount of government control that there is.
    19. Satire is to show a flaw in society through humour or other means. 1984 is satirical because it is showing the flaw in society of the government having to much control and the impact that this could have in the future.
    20. That too much government control is bad and that individuals should have freedom and that there should be no censorship. The context of Orwell is during the cold war so he probably believed that too much control by the government could lead to the world that we see in 1984.

  3. Jack says:

    1984 Study Questions

    1. The footage shown at the start of the film is pictures of a peaceful and pleasant land. These are then replaced by shots of vicious military personal from the opposing army. This juxtaposition tells the audience that the film is going to have a miserable and war-stricken setting. The film shows the people who are watching the footage are loyal, quick to anger and have a mob mentality.
    2. The settings of Winston’s apartment, Winston’s office and the cafeteria all reflect the lack of common comforts in the world. They also show that everything is based on efficiency and the bare essentials. For example, Winston’s office is tiny, just big enough for him to do his job, and is crammed into one room with many other such “cubicles.” The fact that they eat out of dixies in the cafeteria and drink out of metal pannikins shows that there lives are cold and industrialised.
    3. Winston is starting to age and his body seems like it is weak. He is also quite sickly as he coughs all the time and has trouble walking up too many stairs. As Winston is the embodiment of rebellion against the Party, his weakness might symbolise the weakness of resistance.
    4. Winston works at the Ministry of Truth. There, his job is to forge past documents so that they are in accordance with what the Party says at the present time, making the Party infallible. The significance of this in the story is that it shows that the past is able to be written and that what was lies can become truth and vice versa.
    5. Winston’s diary is significant because everything it goes against everything that the Party stands for. Winston calls himself a dead man in the early stages of the film because he knows that he can’t avoid the Thought Police forever, and that someday he will be caught and killed for his crimes.
    6. Newspeak is about controlling the language so much that people can’t have free thought. To do this, words that allow this type of thought must be destroyed, that is why the destruction of words is a “beautiful thing.” “Doubleplusgood” is the epitome of Newspeak as its purpose is to render all other words of that meaning, obsolete. Such as: beautiful, exquisite, marvellous and so on.
    7. The Chestnut Tree Café is significant in the text because it is where both Winston and other significant party members are, when their confessions of betrayal to the Party are being aired “live” on the telescreens. Showing the propaganda aspect of the Party.
    8. Mr Charrington is the owner of an antique shop in the proletariat area. His shop is a window into the past for Winston because it has things there that the Party have not been able to erase. It is one way to express his rebellion to the Party.
    9. Winston’s dream is significant because he sees room 101 but he does not know what is one the other side. In his dream the door opens to the countryside, whereas in reality, the other side of the door is the “worst thing in the world.”
    10. The Party sees the children as responsible for the future of the Party and so they are trained from a young age to be devoted to Big Brother and the Party’s ideals.
    11. The Golden Country shows that there are parts of the world that are still untouched by the Party and the war. Where there is no surveillance and ideals can be expressed.
    12. Winston hates purity and virtue because he hates the Party and that is what it encourages.
    13. “Freedom is the freedom to say 2+2=4” means that if someone is able to think such a thought, than they are free of the control that the Party is trying to establish.
    14. Big Brother, O’Brien and Goldstein all stand for power. They are all symbols of power at different levels and on different sides.
    15. The Ministry of Love is where Thought Criminals are tortured until they love Big Brother. Room 101 is significant because it holds “the worst thing in the world.”
    16. Loyalty and betrayal are often used when referring to the Party. That is that people must be loyal to the Party and Big Brother, and that Thought Criminals betray the Party and Big Brother.
    17. The media is used to spread propaganda and implant false facts and statistics into people’s lives. This use of the media is often used, though not always in such extreme ways, for example in the Soviet Union.
    18. Orwell believes that a dystopic world is a very real possibility in the future and that one usually creates a dystopia on the path to making a utopia.
    19. Satire is: the use of humor, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people’s stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and other topical issues. 1984 could be called a satirical film because it makes comment on the amount of control that governments have and makes a prediction of how this will result in the future.
    20. Orwell wanted to point out societal and government flaws of his time and also to issue a warning to future generations so that they would not let their world become like what we see in 1984.

  4. Ben Robinson says:

    1. Examine the images in the archive footage shown in the opening moments of the film and discuss how these images prepare the audience for the story. How does the film present the people who watch the footage at the very beginning of the film?
    These images present the people watching as easily influenced because of how they react to the film, which is with anger and then utterly content when they see Big Brother’s picture. The images prepare the viewer by showing them that the film has a lot of bad things like war in it and also how people are influenced.

    2. Examine the following settings in the film and discuss how they all contribute to our understanding of the issues the film is dealing with: Winston’s apartment, Winston’s office, and the cafeteria.
    Winston’s apartment is rundown and shabby and this shows that he lives in a poor area, even though he has a job. And also the telescreen on the wall is always watching and he only has his one little corner where he is free of them, which shows that there is a huge amount of domination.
    Winston’s office is very small and confined. Even here there is a telescreen monitoring him. His office looks exactly the same as everybody else’s and this shows that there is a high level of conformity and control.
    The cafeteria represents the main socialising area as being under strict observation and so society is oppressed even when the people are free from their jobs
    3. What do you think about the physical features of Winston? What could they signify?
    The physical features of Winston are rather weak and slight looking because of how in the society that he lives in one single person cannot make that big of a difference and so he is weal in his society
    4. Where does Winston work? What does his job involve? What is the significance of this in the story?
    Winston works in the ministry of truth and his job involves changing the actual truth into the truth that better suits the party’s needs. This is significant because during his time in the ministry of love Winston talks about the real truth and the fact that the truth that the party allows is false, even though he has been the one changing everything.
    5. What is the significance of Winston’s diary? Why does he describe himself as a dead man in the early moments of the film?
    Winston’s diary is significant because it shows that Winston is rebelling against the party and it’s absolute control. It also helps show the negative aspects of the society through Winston’s point of view. He describes himself as a dead man in the beginning because he lacks in power and this means that he has no say, no rights or anything. He is just a puppet for the party and, because puppets do not have a life, he does not either.
    6. Comment on the following quotes in relation to the concept of Newspeak: a) “It’s a beautiful thing, the destruction of words”. b) “Doubleplus good.”
    The first quote is, in relation to newspeak, the foundation for the whole idea. Newspeak destroys words and changes them to make the language simpler and also so that eventually people will not be able to express rebellious thoughts through words, even if they have them. The second quote is an example and the words are, from our context, very silly and strange because we would just say excellent or great.
    7. What is the significance of the Chestnut Tree Café in the film?
    The café in the film is significant because it is the place where Winston shows that he loves big brother and also it is where he rejects Julia. This is shown by how he does not answer the question what is 2+2 when he writes it on dust and says arguably his most famous quote “I don’t love you”
    8. Who is Mr. Charrington? What does his antique shop mean to Winston?
    Mr Charrington is the owner of an antique shop and his shop is important to Winston because it has parts of history in it that have not been altered by the party and this is ironic because t is his job to alter history like this.
    9. What is the significance of Winston’s dream?
    The significance of Winston’s dream is that it is foreshadowing his being captured and changed to better suit the party’s wants and needs. This means that deep down Winston knows that he will be caught in the end but he still continues to defy their will.
    10. Comment on the Party’s perception of children in relation to the children’s song heard during Winston’s train journey before he met Julia: “We are the children / Builders of the future / And we the children swear to thee / Loyal emotion, fearless devotion / And to die with dignity”
    The party’s perception of children is that they are easy to change and mold to what they want, and also that since they are the ones who will grow up into the future population they control the future. This means that the party controls the future if they control the children. Also, the party thinks that children are far more loyal compared to adults because they are already swearing to do what the party wants.
    11. What does the Golden Country where Winston and Julia secretly meet represent in the film? How does it differ from the earlier settings in the film?
    The earlier settings in the film are all very desolate and filthy, and this is compared to the golden country where Julia and Winston meet, and this shows that there are massive changes between the two places. Also there are no telescreens and this shows the level of freedom that is there. The place represents the change that is occurring and freedom in a metaphorical form.
    12. Comment on Winston’s following words: “I hate purity. I hate goodness. I don’t want virtue to exist anywhere. I want everyone corrupt.”
    The party claims to be purity, goodness and virtue in the story, and Winston hates the party and wishes that it didn’t exist. Also, he does not like the idea of Julia being virtuous because the party enforces the idea of being virtuous, pure etc and hence by people not being virtuous he is rebelling against the party ion his own way.
    13. Comment on the following quote from the film: “Freedom is the freedom to say two plus two equals four.”
    This statement can also be summarized as meaning that freedom is the power to say what you want when you want, which is seen as one of our core human rights. Winston is saying that the freedom to say whatever you want is the core right that would lead to freedom. This is also ironic because of the newspeak that Winston is involved in.
    14. What do Big Brother, O’Brien and Goldstein stand for in the story?
    Big Brother stands for the symbol that everyone follows and this is important because people always need a leader. O’Brien stands for the power that enforces control and this is important because it makes a statement about how there is nothing that people in power won’t do to get what they want. Goldstein stands for the object of hate that people will hate for no reason other than that they were told to hate it by some external influence.
    15. What is the function and significance of the Ministry of Love in the film? What is the significance of Room 101
    The ministry of love is responsible for teaching people to love Big Brother. The significance of it is that they get inside people’s heads and change how they think through torture and pain mainly but also through isolation. The significance of room 101 is that it is the place where everyone must face their innermost fears.
    16. What are the definitions of “loyalty” and “betrayal” in the film? Identify quotes from the film and discuss these two concepts.
    Loyalty in the film is being completely devoted to Big Brother and the party. It also involves believing everything that they say. This is shown by how people who do not automatically agree with what Big Brother says are classified as insane but as soon as they do not they are cured. “I ask only that you can accept my total love for our leader, Big Brother”
    Betrayal in the film involves every little thought against the party no matter how small and/or insignificant it is. This is called though crime and there is even a thought police that enforces the laws against thought crime and people will do anything not to be accused of it “I didn’t do anything, take him. He did it, he’s the criminal, he’s the one you want”
    17. Identify the ways the media is used in Oceania and discuss its role. Can you think of any cases where mass media have been used in similar ways? Discuss when, where and how.
    In Oceania the media is totally controlled by the party. The news is always playing and telling people about Big Brother’s exploits. Also, it tells people about how the war is going well and how there are no problems in Oceania, which people believe. It is also through the telescreens that are everywhere and always on that people are constantly watched by the party. One example of this is today’s society is the way that Arabic people were portrayed during the war on Iraq so that there was a stronger support for the invasion.
    18. Study the concepts of “utopia” and “dystopia” and discuss Orwell’s vision of the future in relation to these two concepts.
    Dystopia is the ultimate bad place in the world, whereas a Utopia is the perfect place where everyone is always happy. Utopias are, in theory, an impossible ideal, whereas some people would say that we live in a dystopia today. Orwell’s vision of the future was that the world would be a dystopia even though people would see the world as a utopia, like in 1984.
    19. Identify what “satire” means and in what ways “Nineteen Eighty-Four” can be called a satirical film.
    Satire is the use of exaggeration and irony to show flaws in society and this is done very well in 1984. The surveillance is exaggerated by all the telescreens. Also the absolute love for Big Brother and people’s willingness to follow is exaggerated and the irony is everywhere, such as Winston’s interest in the truth when it is his job to change the past to make lies a truth.
    20. Michael Bradford’s film is based on George Orwell’s novel. What message(s) do you think Orwell wanted to convey through such a novel?
    I think that George Orwell wanted to pass on a message that he thought that society was going in the wrong direction and that he thought that the government of the time was trying to have too much power. Also I think that he was trying to make a point about what he thought about wars, that they were just a waste of time and people because they were mainly a political tool to gain support or to try to take over.

  5. James Kirk says:

    1. Examine the images in the archive footage shown in the opening moments of the film and discuss how these images prepare the audience for the story. How does the film present the people who watch the footage at the very beginning of the film? 

    The opening images show peace and harmony and show an illusion of what INGSOC want their people to believe. It gently gains the total loyalty of the people so that when the story is told the people will support them completely. The film presents the people who are watching it as companions who are working for a single honorable cause. The opening scene shows the malleability of a humans mind and how easily it can be manipulated.
    2. Examine the following settings in the film and discuss how they all contribute to our understanding of the issues the film is dealing with: Winston’s apartment, Winston’s office, and the cafeteria. 

    These settings are three completely different settings. Winston’s apartment is a lonely dingy apartment with little furniture and Big Brother always watching him. This setting is a representation of Winston’s own life which is lonely and has very little of interest in it only a few things like his journal. Winston’s show Winston in a room just like everyone else’s except Winston is the only one in the segregated groups of offices that look up and around from his desk in hope of something more than just fixing newspapers up in what they say. The cafeteria is the one place where everyone seems to interact if only in the segregated groups. However what they say to each other is of little substance and show the mundane way everyone leads they’re lives and how there isn’t a lot of individuality in thoughts or feelings except for Winston’s.
    3. What do you think about the physical features of Winston? What could they signify? 

    Winston’s physical features show a scene of dismay. He is wrinkling skin and bone with oily hair and glasses. Winston’s scrawny figure suggests that Winston’s has been living in the same degrading conditions for a long time to get to the terrible state he’s in. These physical features of Winston’s show that the people aren’t properly cared for even though the illusion is that airstrip 1 is a utopia.
    4. Where does Winston work? What does his job involve? What is the significance of this in the story? 

    Winston works in an area called the ‘Ministry of Truth’. His job involves reading the newspapers and bringing things up to date so that they say the right thing for the illusion of airstrip 1’s utopia to continue without questions asked.
    5. What is the significance of Winston’s diary? Why does he describe himself as a dead man in the early moments of the film? 

    Winston’s secret diary is the one place where Winston can be himself and say what he wants. Through his day he is forced to talk and think in ‘newspeak’ an emotionless and boring form of English, which leaves no room for thoughts of rebellion or disbelief of INGSOC’s illusion. Winston describes himself as a dead man because he realizes the world for what it is with the thought police and Big Brother and is aware that by writing his thoughts in his diary and expressing himself, he is breaking the unofficial law of having no freedom of thought, which is punishable by death.
    6. Comment on the following quotes in relation to the concept of Newspeak: a) “It’s a beautiful thing, the destruction of words”. b) “Doubleplus good.”

    a) Spoken by a member of the newspeak committee. He appears glad that words are being taken out of the language and that the language is being destroyed in order for people not to think but rather be disciplined. Winston does not seem to agree with his view.
    b) ‘Doubleplus good’ is and emotionless way of stating that something is very good or excellent. By taking away the peoples language they limit the freedom of their thought to virtually only what they want them to think.
    7. What is the significance of the Chestnut Tree Café in the film?
    Under the spreading Chestnut tree, I sold you, you sold me. The chestnut tree café is when people who have had there mind alternated by the ministry of love recover. It is the first place someones knows once they have come out of the ministry of love.
    8. Who is Mr. Charrington? What does his antique shop mean to Winston? 

    Mr. Charrington is the antique store owner. The antique contains things from ages past. Ages when there was no war, no Big Brother and no thought police. From I time when peoples imaginations and thoughts ran wild and free. Knowing only the restricted thought life, Winston is fascinated with anything old because it represents those people and there free. Something Winston wishes he had.
    9. What is the significance of Winston’s dream? 

    Winston’s dream is a dream of his mother or a close relative dying. He is in pain and a man comes and puts his arm from him while they watch as rats crawl over the women’s body and eat it. This moment of seeing his mother eaten by rats later flares an absolute mortification of them
    10. Comment on the Party’s perception of children in relation to the children’s song heard during Winston’s train journey before he met Julia: “We are the children / Builders of the future / And we the children swear to thee / Loyal emotion, fearless devotion / And to die with dignity”

    The Party consider children as the future and in order for them to have the future the party wants it is essential in their eyes to drills things as simple as songs into them which strongly promote what their role is in life so that from a young age and even when they grow up they won’t question the world or start getting ideas the party wouldn’t want.
    11. What does the Golden Country where Winston and Julia secretly meet represent in the film? How does it differ from the earlier settings in the film? 

    The Golden Country represents freedom from the war and real peace. It represents the freedom the can never have for fear of their lives and the thoughts which have been put n their heads. The Golden Country is beautiful tranquil. It is a lush green countryside of rolling hills and a light breeze, compared to the earlier settings of ruins and rubble, of dull grey dreary rock and emotionless, colorless surroundings.
    12. Comment on Winston’s following words: “I hate purity. I hate goodness. I don’t want virtue to exist anywhere. I want everyone corrupt.”

    Winston view on purity and goodness and virtue is what he has been told by INGSOC and what is displayed to him everyday. He realizes that he hates it and believes that what it is, is what is shown to him each and everyday, so he wants to be free of it.
    13. Comment on the following quote from the film: “Freedom is the freedom to say two plus two equals four.”
    This displays that Winston can see that true freedom is nearly completely snuffed out. 2+2=4 is one of the most basic truths there is and Winston is saying that people even doubt whether that is true.
    14. What do Big Brother, O’Brien and Goldstein stand for in the story? 

    Big Brother is a figure, often thought of to have been made up by the party for the people to worship and obey so that the party remains controlling all the people. O’Brien represents the party and there deceptiveness and eagerness to have control and have power for the sake of having power. Goldstein is also believed to be and figure conjured by the party for the people to hate so that they turn to Big Brother instead.
    15. What is the function and significance of the Ministry of Love in the film? What is the significance of Room 101? 

    The Ministry of Love’s function is to control the people and make them believe what the party wants them to believe through torture and mind manipulation. Without the Ministry of Love, people would start thinking for themselves and rebelling in free will. Room 101 is the ultimate means of breaking a person and destroying their mind. In Room 101 the strongest people are broken by having to confront their deepest fear, which nobody has conquered. Without Room 101 and its methods, some of the strongest minds would survive and spread rebellion through the people.
    16. What are the definitions of “loyalty” and “betrayal” in the film? Identify quotes from the film and discuss these two concepts.
    A quote is ‘They got you too’, ‘They got me a long time ago’. This shows the betrayal of o’brien to Smith. O’Brien makes Winston trust him and think he’s on the rebellions side but then shows that it was all a ploy so to lure Winston in and exploit him as a thought criminal. Loyalty is show through Winston’s loyalty to his own ideas and thoughts. Even in the face of death he tries to hold onto them and know the truth.
    17. Identify the ways the media is used in Oceania and discuss its role. Can you think of any cases where mass media have been used in similar ways? Discuss when, where and how. 

    Media is used in Oceania to control the people and show them how to live. Big Brother is always watching and the televisions have people come on to get them up and moving every morning and to make sure they aren’t misbehaving and breaking the law. The constant news updates keep the illusion going that everything is how it should be. Even in today’s world the people are influenced greatly by media. Whoever or whatever is popular is what people want or want to be like. An example of this is fashion in clothes. Clothing fashions are created by famous or popular people who start where certain clothes. Then because they’re wearing them, everyone else wants to wear them and a fashion soon starts which more and more people are drawn into. In this example the famous people are the media which manipulates peoples views.
    18. Study the concepts of “utopia” and “dystopia” and discuss Orwell’s vision of the future in relation to these two concepts. 

    A utopia can be most simply described as a perfect society, and a dystopia can be described as a utopia gone wrong. Orwell’s vision of the future was of corrupt people controlling the population by the illusion of a utopia but they were rather actually living in a dystopia. It was a world where the only good came from the uncorrupted people who want to have a utopia but knew that what they were living in wasn’t one.
    19. Identify what “satire” means and in what ways “Nineteen Eighty-Four” can be called a satirical film. 

    Satire is the use of humour, irony, exaggeration or ridicule to expose and criticize peoples stupidity and vices. 1984 could be considered a satirical film because of the exaggeration of the storyline and the extremes used. Also the different ministries mock what the titles say they’re about. The ministry of love contains no love but rather torture and pain and manipulation. The Ministry of Truth does no have much, if any truth to it. It is all lies conjured buy the party. And finally the ministry of plenty has problems finding enough let alone plenty.
    20. Michael Bradford’s film is based on George Orwell’s novel. What message(s) do you think Orwell wanted to convey through such a novel?
    George Orwell wanted to convey the message that in a world that seems normal or even perfect there are always major flaws in the system working behind the scenes and that person of group of people working behind the scenes usually do so by the use of power and the greatest power in the real world is political power. He is conveying the subtle hint that the government might not always be what they seem and may be working for or actually be the very evil we’re fighting against in our day to day lives.

  6. Jake Gardiner says:

    Here are the questions from 6-16 the rest is done in my book, except from 17-20 which I had trouble with. Thanks

    6. Comment on the following quotes in relation to the concept of Newspeak: a) “It’s a beautiful thing, the destruction of words”. b) “Doubleplus good.”
    a) Newspeak are destroying words that are supposedly obsolete. This seems to grant big brother more control, if people are only to use words that he tells them to. b) One guy working on them claims that we need no word for bad, just ungood. it’s better because we only have to remember the word good. This also means that people can’t really complain much with serious words.

    7. What is the significance of the Chestnut Tree Café in the film?
    The Chestnut tree Cafe is a place where there is no law of frequenting, but still it doesn’t seem right to do so.

    8. Who is Mr. Charrington? What does his antique shop mean to Winston?
    Mr Charrington owns an antique shop that Winston frequently visits. This shop is a refuge for Winston where he can buy “illegal” goods that are supposed to be banned. e.g. a beautiful glass piece “at least 100 years old.”

    9. What is the significance of Winston’s dream?
    Winstons dream is foreshadowing of a future event.

    10. Comment on the Party’s perception of children in relation to the children’s song heard during Winston’s train journey before he met Julia: “We are the children / Builders of the future / And we the children swear to thee / Loyal emotion, fearless devotion / And to die with dignity”
    The Party uses the children primarily to monitor their parents, the song is putting the message in their heads from a young age to follow and listen to the leaders.

    11. What does the Golden Country where Winston and Julia secretly meet represent in the film? How does it differ from the earlier settings in the film?
    The Golden country is a place of freedom and life. It is so different from the city with green tree’s and life compared to the broken grey buildings of the city.

    12. Comment on Winston’s following words: “I hate purity. I hate goodness. I don’t want virtue to exist anywhere. I want everyone corrupt.”
    Winston is talking about the party’s perception of what is right and wrong. Winston hates this idea of pureness, being so unnatural to human existence in it’s natural way.

    13. Comment on the following quote from the film: “Freedom is the freedom to say two plus two equals four.”
    Freedom is the allowance to speak the truth, and not to listen to the party’s perception of what may be right. This is discussed later in the film during the torture scene.

    14. What do Big Brother, O’Brien and Goldstein stand for in the story?
    Big brother stands for the big overlord that is never seen and who’s existence is questioned. O’Brien is the party loyal member that lures thought criminals in pretending to be on their side, he is the double crosser that no one should trust but can’t help it. Goldstein is the person everyone is taught to hate, he stands for freedom but is seen as evil.

    15. What is the function and significance of the Ministry of Love in the film? What is the significance of Room 101?
    The ministry of love is to “re-educate,” thought criminals, and for that matter probably all criminals against the law. Room 101 is the room of absolute fear for everyone. It is a torture chamber where your worst fear is to come true. “The thing that is in Room 101 is the worst thing in the world.”

    16. What are the definitions of “loyalty” and “betrayal” in the film? Identify quotes from the film and discuss these two concepts.

    17. Identify the ways the media is used in Oceania and discuss its role. Can you think of any cases where mass media have been used in similar ways? Discuss when, where and how.

    18. Study the concepts of “utopia” and “dystopia” and discuss Orwell’s vision of the future in relation to these two concepts.

    19. Identify what “satire” means and in what ways “Nineteen Eighty-Four” can be called a satirical film.

    20. Michael Bradford’s film is based on George Orwell’s novel. What message(s) do you think Orwell wanted to convey through such a novel?

  7. oli says:

    1. Examine the images in the archive footage shown in the opening moments of the film and discuss how these images prepare the audience for the story.
    The initial frames of the film show the face of big brother, and screaming crowds of people saluting his image. This shows the audience that this is a dystopic world, characterized by totalitarian control. Also, images of chaos and war are shown, foreshadowing for a chaotic dystopia.
    2. Examine the following settings in the film and discuss how they all contribute to our understanding of the issues the film is dealing with: Winston’s apartment, Winston’s office, the cafeteria.

    Winston’s apartment is bare. He has only his bed, a small table, his large big brother display and the tiny niche where he keeps his illegal diary. Winsotn’s office is similar to many cubicle offices. It is cramped, noisy and dark. He burns outdated news stories. He has a small screen showing big brother on his wall. He is under constant observation in both these places. The cafeteria is once again cramped, dark and noisy.
    3. What do you think about the physical features of Winston? What could they signify?
    Winston is old, unhealthy looking and a fairly average example of a repressed male. His age signifies his weakness, and that while once he was stronger, now he in powerless. His unhealthiness shows his dissatisfaction with his world. His average ness is a symbol that this repression and punishment is universal in this alternate 1984.
    
4. Where does Winston work? What does his job involve? What is the significance of this in the story?
    Winston works in the ministry of Truth, responsible for the redistribution of news headlines. The is ironic, since the ministry is responsible for lying.
    
5. What is the significance of Winston’s diary? Why does he describe himself as a dead man in the early moments of the film?
    Winston’s diary is his major thought crime. He is illegally keeping a diary of his thoughts and feelings. This is already enough for him to be put to death by the government.
    
6. Comment on the following quotes in relation to the concept of Newspeak: a) “It’s a beautiful thing, the destruction of words”. b) “Doubleplus good.”
    Words have been changed completely. There are no longer words for bad, or more colorful words. Big brother is changing the way people think by controlling the language. This is a comment on society, and the use of media to control people.
    
7. What is the significance of the Chestnut Tree Café in the film?
    The Café is the place where all of the people who are reconditioned by the government go. They beceome mindless and play chess.
    8. Who is Mr. Charrington? What does his antique shop mean to Winston?
    The antique shop is another place where Winston commits crimes. He buys things that should have been destroyed. It represents freedom.
    
9. What is the significance of Winston’s dream?
    Winstons dream once again reperestns freedom, and that there are some elemesnt of people that always remain free.
    
10. Comment on the Party’s perception of children in relation to the children’s song heard during Winston’s train journey before he met Julia: “We are the children / Builders of the future / And we the children swear to thee / Loyal emotion, fearless devotion / And to die with dignity”
    the song that the children sing is party propaganda. It shows that the children wholly believe in big brother’s ideas through extensive conditioning. The fact that even the children have been turned into emotionless tools, is one of the more horrifying elements of the book.
    
11. What does the Golden Country where Winston and Julia secretly meet represent in the film? How does it differ from the earlier settings in the film?

    The countryside represents freedom. In contrast to all of the rest of the movie, the countryside is empty, colorful, and alive. It is the only place where trees and grass are seen, and where there are no other people.
    12. Comment on Winston’s following words: “I hate purity. I hate goodness. I don’t want virtue to exist anywhere. I want everyone corrupt.”
    Winston is showing tha he believes everyone should have the freedoms that are fundamental to human rights, whether it makes the corrupt or not.
    
13.Comment on the following quote from the film: “Freedom is the freedom to say two plus two equals four.”
    Freedom here is depicted to be the freedom to say what is true, something that has been removed in the sociotey of INGSOC.
    14. What do Big Brother, O’Brien and Goldstein stand for in the story?


    Big brother, O’Brien and Goldstein all stand for the supposed betterment of the human race through completely dehumanizing them.

    15. What is the function and significance of the Ministry of Love in the film?

    The ministry of love re-educates those party members guilty of thought crime. It is a place where people are tortured and killed. This goes against the word “love” in its usual sense, but represents the party’s ideal of love for nothing but big brother.

    What is the significance of Room 101?


    Room 101 is the final room of the ministry of love. It is the place where the captive is shown their greatest fear, to finally break their spirit. It represents the worst thing in the world, and fear.

    16. What are the definitions of “loyalty” and “betrayal” in the film?

    Loyalty is loyalty to Big brother alone. Betrayal is loyalty to anyone else. In the movie, it is said “It is not enough to obey big brother, you must love him,” showing the ultimate level of commitment that is demanded by the party.

    17. Identify the ways the media is used in Oceania and discuss its role. Can you think of any cases where mass media have been used in similar ways?
    Discuss when, where and how.


    Media is used to brainwash the population. As well as this, every television screen is two way, symbolizing the level of control that is perpetuated through media alone. Propaganda was used in almost every country in the second world war. Governments censored and regulated the truth to keep public support and enlistments into the armed forces high.

    18. Study the concepts of “utopia” and “dystopia” and discuss Orwell’s vision of the future in relation to these two concepts.

    The party sets out to create a utopia but in the end (at least to Winston) creates a dystrophic world. INGSOC attempted to make mankind one unit, one many limbed organism by completely removing individualism.
    
19. Identify what “satire” means and in what ways “Nineteen Eighty-Four” can be called a satirical film.


    Satire is the use of irony, humor, exaggeration or ridicule to expose or criticize an ideal, usually in modern politics. “Nineteen Eighty-Four” is satirical in that it exposes the distortion of truth and justice that are carried out under many governments, supposedly for the betterment of the race,

    20. Michael Bradford’s film is based on George Orwell’s novel. What message(s) do you think Orwell wanted to convey through such a novel?

    That mankind cannot exist in a utopia. That people, no matter how advanced we are, are always inherently savage towards one another. That war is a tool. That the media is one of the most powerful influences upon people.

  8. lucas says:

    1984 study Qs

    1. The footage at the start of the film shows a nice, peaceful place with people living happily but these images are replaced by shots of war and violence. The people watching react to the images predictably and when a picture of ‘Big Brother’; their leader, comes on to the screen, they all salute the image and the audience is shown how faithful and believing they are of the leader of their society.

    2. Winston’s apartment, his office and the cafeteria all appear similar and have no unneeded or aesthetic items. They contain only the bare essentials for living and optimal efficiency. The settings of these locations show how much Winston’s society suppresses happiness and free will. It is shown how the society is industrialized and without feeling when they eat out of metal containers and live such structured and planned lives.

    3. Winston’s character is very frail, weak and seemingly unhealthy. He is always coughing and looking sick and his character could be seen as a reference to the resistance against ‘the party’ which is weak and nearly hopeless.

    4. Winston works at the ‘ministry of truth’ where he changes past documents to agree with the party’s current rules and position so that the party’s decisions are unarguable and invincible. His job in the story shows how in the society, things can be rewritten and anything can become truth.

    5. Winston’s diary is significant in the story because in it he writes everything that he is banned from doing. Everything he writes in the diary is about freedom and free will which are the most opposed things in the eyes of the party. He calls himself a dead man at the start of the story because he knows that he cannot live the way he does for ever and he will be caught and killed for his actions in a matter of time.

    6. In Winston’s society, the party uses ‘Newspeak’ to control what people are allowed to say and therefore limiting their freedom. Newspeak phrases in the movie such as ‘the destruction of words is a beautiful thing’ and ‘doubleplusgood’ show how limited the people in the society are when trying to express things. Words like ‘doubleplusgood’ eliminate the use of other words like excellent, great etc. This creates barriers of language and reduces expression.

    7. The Chestnut Tree Café is significant in the story because it is where where people go once they have been ‘treated’ in the ministry of love and where their supposedly live confessions are aired for everyone to see as part of the party’s propaganda in the society.

    8. Mr Charrington is the antique store owner that sells Winston items from the past before the party, big brother and the thought police. He helps to show Winston what life was like before when there was happiness and freedom in life and shows rebellion against the party and their society.

    9. Winston’s dream is significant because it shows how his selfishness when he was a child caused the death of his family, and the act of having chocolate was considered a severely punishable offence and the society keeps everyone in fear by having ridiculous punishments for anything that goes against the party’s beliefs.

    10. In the society children are seen as the future of the party so they are taught immediately to worship the party and Big Brother and see everything in their society as a good thing so they will not provide any challenges for the party when they grow up.

    11. The Golden Country represents the beauty and peace that is still present in the world, untouched by the party and war. In the Golden Country there are none of the rules that apply in the society and nothing is suppressed. The Golden Country is the opposite to the war-torn, controlled place where people are forced to live in the story.

    12. Winston says he hates purity and virtue because it is what he is told by his society and he hates everything that the party and INGSOC represent.

    13. The quote ‘freedom is the freedom to say 2+2=4′ shows that people are able to think what they like and live with truth. The party controls society in a way that they can force people to believe anything they want and rewrite truth.

    14. Big Brother is a figure made up by the party to give people something specific to worship. O’brien represents the party and the control that it puts on the people in the society. Goldstein represents the enemy that the party are constantly at war against and is just a figure that the inhabitants of the society can direct their hate towards.

    15. THe Ministry of Love is the place where people who stand against the party; thought criminals, are tortured until they love the party and Big Brother. Room 101 contains the ‘worst thing in the world’ and horrifies the though criminals so much that they give up their secrets and turn towards the party.

    17. Media in the story is constantly used to fill people with fear and always confront them with images of the war being fought and how good Oceania is. Other examples of media being used to such affect are apparent everywhere to a lesser extent with the media always exaggerating circumstances and creating more fear and paranoia than is needed.

    18. A utopia is a perfect society where there are no problems which is unrealistic and a dystopia is a society where everything has gone wrong, usually the effect of an attempt at creating a utopia. Orwell saw a chance of a dystopic world in the future with governments and leaders having too much power and control, and in the attempt at creating a utopia, created a dystopia instead.

    19. Satire is the use of humour, irony, exaggeration or ridicule to expose and criticize peoples stupidity and vices. Often used to criticize politics and in 1984, Orwell uses satire to express his view that governments could gain too much power and control and create a dystopic society in the future.

    20. George Orwell tried to express the message that in the future, if governments continue to gain power a dystopic society could be created, and even if a society seems utopic or normal there are always things not right about them.

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