Chapter 1 – Part II
1. What has happened to Meursault?
2. Is he taking his circumstances seriously? Give an example.
3. What question does the attorney feel compelled to ask?
4. What explanation does Meursault give regarding his “nature”?
5. How many times did Meursault fire his revolver?
6. The magistrate becomes frustrated with Meursault. What does he retrieve from his filing cabinet?
7. What’s the BIG question the magistrate finally asks Meursault?
8. Meursault says, “I thought about it for a minute and said that more than sorry I felt kind of annoyed.” Does Meursault have a conscience? Why or why not?
9. In your opinion, does Meursault feel complimented when referred to as Monsieur Antichrist?

Chapter 2 – Part II
1. Briefly describe Meursault’s prison cell. Is this what he had expected?
2. Who is Meursault’s first visitor?
3. Describe Marie’s mood during the visit.
4. In a sense, what item was more difficult for Meursault to lose than his freedom?
5. Meursault states that having “a memory” is “an advantage.” Briefly explain.
6. The last sentences on p. 81 refer to Meursault’s mother’s funeral and to what nights in prison are like. In your opinion, is there a connection between the two?

Chapter 3 – Part II
1. What is Meursault’s first impression of the jury?
2. What clues is the reader given to show that the Algerian court system is different than the U.S. Judicial System?
3. Who are the eight witnesses that will testify at Meursault’s trial?
4. A previous incident occurred between the caretaker and Meursault, which is briefly discussed during the trial. This leads to Camus’ title of the novel. What is the incident?
5. When Celeste, the fourth witness, is called to testify, how does he show support for Meursault?
6. How does the prosecutor attempt to prove that Meursault has no conscience?
7. What is the prosecutor implying when he questions Raymond? (refers to “chance” numerous times.)
8. Explain what Meursault means when he says, “it was back to my cell…sleep of the innocent.

Chapter 4 – Part II
1. Does Meursault feel like he has anything to say to defend himself?
2. In your opinion, does Meursault believe that his crime was premeditated?
3. Meursault reveals the key to his character/personality. What is this?
4. What penalty does the prosecutor ask of the jury?
5. Does Meursault have faith that his attorney will convince the jury of his innocence?
6. Imagism is used in “left me with the impression…. Was making me dizzy.” In your opinion, what is Meursault feeling at this point?
7. Why can’t Meursault return Marie’s smile in the courtroom?
8. What is Meursault’s sentence? In your opinion, is his reaction normal?

Chapter 5 – Part II
1. According to Meursault, why is witnessing an execution so important?
2. What is “the trouble with the guillotine”?
3. What is ironic about this when compared to how Meursault originally got into this predicament?
4. When Meursault’s situation finally “sinks in”, what are the two things he always thinks about?
5. What is Meursault’s pessimistic view on life and living?
6. Is Meursault a religious person? How do you know?
7. Meursault shows no respect for religion or the priest. Give one example of this.
8. What does the priest mean when he says, “your heart is blind.”
9. In the last few paragraphs, how does Meursault finally relate to his mother?
10. Why does Meursault wish that a large crowd of spectators greet him with cries of hate at his execution?

9 Responses to “The Stranger – Part II”
  1. Will S says:

    Chapter I

    1. Meursault has been arrested for killing an Arab on the beach as described at the end of Part I. He was taken into custody and asked the general questions so that the authorities could take charge of who and what he was. He is asked whether he has chosen a defence “…he wanted to know if I had chosen a lawyer. I confessed and inquired whether it was necessary to have one.” (p. 63), this shows how clueless the magistrates thinks he is but the reader knows of his absurdist attitude and that he simply is indifferent about it all.

    2. Although the text begs to differ, I believe that Meursault is taking his situation seriously, but only as seriously as he knows how. Think about the situation, you are a man who feels indifferent about life, so you haven’t gotten very far. Then you finally make a decision that requires you to care about your future, but because you never have had to before you don’t know what to do so it appears that you are all to aloof for the situation. This is why the text produces thoughts for him such as “I’d read similar descriptions in books before and it all seemed like a game.” (p. 64) For a man to think being interrogated, ‘game-like’ is truly not the response that we believe for someone who is taking their situation seriously.

    3. Meursault is sat down with his attorney in a room and he begins to ask him some personal questions. This is so to get a background knowledge of Meursault’s case. Quickly he finds things such as “…my mother had died recently in a home…I’d displayed a lack of emotion on the day of mother’s funeral.” (p. 64) This such knowledge puzzles the attorney as Meursault assures him that he was not stricken with grief and knew exactly what was happening. This is how Meursault is reacting and the attorney seems to think that he wants to go to prison because of his unco-operating nature.

    4. As Meursault has revealed many times in the book, he only reacts to those things that he is physically able to feel. He reveals that “…by nature my physical needs often distort my feelings.” (p. 65) This is one thing that the attorney can’t grasp since it is usually the other way around. His nature seems not of a normal person but yet pushes on with his investigation.

    5. The magistrate asks him “…if I’d fired all shots at once. I thought it over and specified that I’d only fired one shot to start with and then, a few seconds later, the other four shots.” (p. 67) This could be seen as pre-mediated murder but in Meursault’s case, it is more likely that he fired the other four shots simply for the physical pleasure of the noise that he made and seeing how the bullets disappear beneath the man’s flesh.

    6. The magistrate quickly becomes frustrated with Meursault, “…opened a drawer in a filing cabinet. He took out a silver crucifix and came back towards me brandishing it.” (p. 67) This symbol of ultimate suffering is what the magistrate shows Meursault in hope that it will break his spirit. He then tells him that he must have a hardened soul since all other criminals weep at this symbol

    7. The big question that the magistrate asks ironically is one of the major themes in the book, absurdity of life. He asks “Do you want my life to become meaningless?” (p. 68), this statement is in conjunction with that if he stops believing that his life will be no longer living. This is how Meursault cases the magistrate to have a breakdown of his internal walls, for Meursault it does not matter if someone has suffered for what he has done. He has already performed his task and whatever happens as a result will happen.

    8. Meursault says, “I thought about it for a minute and said that more than sorry I felt kind of annoyed.” This statement would bewilder most in that he is a bit ticked off that he has to go through all this trouble because of what he has done and would rather just get on with it. This is a statement that would most likely come out of a serial killer with no remorse for his actions. This is why Meursault is seen not to have a conscience but simply a thought that the world is wasting his time.

    9. I feel that the name “Monsieur Antichrist” that Meursault is slapped with he feels quite attached to since he has never really been anything in his life that has mattered and finally has been given a title that could have some effect of his life.

  2. Will S says:

    Chapter 2

    1. Meursault explains that his cell felt like his home but his life was at a standstill. He says “…I was put in a room with several other prisoners…they laughed when they saw me. Then they asked me what I’d done.” (p. 71) this shows how he was simply thrown into a cell with men that because they were Arab could of potentially killed or beaten him up. The cell must have been filthy as Meursault felt bugs crawl all over his face at night.

    2. Meursault was clinging to the bars when he realised that he was getting a visitor “I thought it must be Marie. It was.” (p. 72) this shows Marie’s dedication to Meursault even though he has done the unspeakable and killed a man. Marie is still deeply fond of him. He was led down into the visiting chamber which separated the visitors from the criminals.

    3. Marie shows her mood in a concerned nature that already reflect her character “Are you alright, have you got everything you want?” (p.73) Her and Meursault briefly talk causing a silence as Meursault dreams that he could touch the fabric of his dress.

    4. Meursault feels the most pain in that all his senses have been cut off from the world which is how his character thrives. “I wanted to feel the soft material and I didn’t quite know what else I was supposed to keep hoping for. (p. 73) The reader can almost feel the pain in Meursault’s voice as he can’t get to the thing that he truly desires. Being such a sensual revolving person this is what truly causes him to feel his emotions finally.

    5. As Meursault is cut off from everything that could stimulate him he uses his memory to re-imagine what he has once felt. It is this that gives him an advantage over those who have lost everything for so long. One example of this is “…I’d remember every piece of furniture, every object and, on every object…” (p. 77) this could almost be seen as obsessive but as Meursault has nothing to react too, it is his only resort bar sleeping.

    6. The line “No, there was no way out and no one can imagine what evenings in prison are like.” (p. 79) reveal that Meursault is comparing his life in prison to death particularly his mother’s. It is a very central theme and for Meursault, confinement is the closest thing to death that he can imagine for he can find no way out of his situation without help, much like death for someone with no beliefs.

  3. Will S says:

    Chapter 3

    1. Meursault’s first impression of the jury are “…just one impression: I was in a tram and all these anonymous passengers on the opposite seat were scrutinising the new arrival…” (p. 81). His views were that all around him were judging him from the second he entered the room, even though he has already been in prison for a few months causing him to have a shabby appearance. He feels that he his future is in the hands of these people that whom he does not even know. How this effects Meursault is in the way that he had his senses cut off from the world and can no longer feel.

    2. The reader is given clues to the working of the Algerian court system through Meursault’s thoughts. He observes every detail of that which interests him such as the clothing that the prosecutor and his lawyer were wearing. “Three judges, two in black the third in red, came carrying files and walked briskly…” (p. 83) This shows how the system differs from the U.S. system as it is much more haughty and self-obsessed and hence flawed.

  4. Will S says:

    Chapter 3 cont.

    3. Although Meursault is a man that does not cling to people there are eight people that aid him in his trial “…I saw the warden and the caretaker from the home, old Thomas Perez, Raymond, Masson, Salamano and Marie…” (p. 84), Meursault is almost surprised to see these people turn up for his trial. Marie gives him a small wave showing her un-renounced care for him. In this way Meursault shows a glimmer of hope that live may be worth living however it is almost too late for him.

    4. The incident between the caretaker and Meursault is briefly discussed in the book “I hadn’t wanted to see mother, I hadn’t cried once…I didn’t know how old mother was…” (p.86) The title is reflected in this for Meursault acts as one who had nothing to do with the death of his mother even though he is his son. The title reflects that he is alway on the outer of any situation.

    5. Celeste is called to the box and testifies for Meursault, “I think it was a mishap. A mishap, everyone knows what that is. You can’t guard against that.” (p. 89) Celeste tries to show the jury that the whole situation was simply bad timing on both parts but the prosecutor does not buy the idea and continues on with his trial.

    6. Although his witness give their facts true and in his favor the prosecutor states “I accuse this man of burying his mother like a heartless criminal.” The prosecutor is making assumptions that Meursault simply never cared for his mother so he buried her as he saw fit. He is accusing him of having no conscience in that he can not tell that this is not what his mother deserves even though she was buried in a respectable way.

    7. The prosecutor uses ‘by chance’ in describing Raymond’s retelling to try to prove to the jury that nothing just happens by chance so often that it leads to someone’s death. “…by chance that I hadn’t intervened when Raymond had beaten up his mistress, by chance that I’d acted as a witness at the police station…” (p. 92) This shows how it seems Meursault does everything by chance which is highly un-plausible.

    8. When Meursault says “…in a prison as in innocent sleep.” (p. 94) He is saying how he is going back to bed for another day as an innocent man that has not yet been proved entirely guilty.

  5. Will S says:

    Chapter 4

    1. Meursault feel as if there is no point in his defence although more is said about him than his actual crime which he finds odd. The prosecutor states that “…exposing the dark workings of a criminal soul.” (p. 96) is what he has done through his argument. Meursault sits and soaks it all in knowing that finally he is realising what he has done in a new light, with an insight into all his insensitivities.

    2. In my opinion, Meursault was simply doing the wrong thing at the wrong time and armed in the wrong way. Meursault was in a state of confusion when he shot the Arab but this could have been any man although the Arab was holding a knife. However, the prosecutor says “…this man is intelligent…He knows the value of words…no one can say that he acted without realising his actions.” (p. 97) He uses this against Meursault to show that no man can kill another without him realising.

    3. Meursault reveals “…I couldn’t help regretting that he was right. I didn’t much regret what I had done.” (p. 97) This is the final piece of Meursault’s personality puzzle that shows at last how he is indifferent to the world. Why should he care and be remorseful of what he has done if in his eyes it does not matter.

    4. The prosecutor asks that Meursault must meet capital punishment for his crime. “I ask you for this man’s head…” (p. 99) the court feels not regret for this for they see Meursault has no normal human emotions. The treat the case as if the are doing society a favor. To them he is a monster.

    5. Somehow Meursault loses his faith in his lawyer to keep him out of the deep end and prove his innocence. This is finally unlike Meursault’s character that is indifferent to all, he finally values life in a way the text has not shown before and is not almost afraid of losing it “…I thought my lawyer was ridiculous.” (p. 100) In the text he tears apart his own lawyers arguments in his head showing them all flawed.

    6. When Meursault says “I was so hot and so surprised that I felt dizzy.” (p. 99) this could be Meursault realising how real his sentence could be. He is finally shocked to see that he is scared of death but has not felt the emotion before so does not know what to do with it. This is way left Meursault feeling this way.

    7. Meursault finally has no control of his emotions and is unable to return the smile to Marie “…my heart felt locked and I couldn’t even smile back.” (p. 102) This is his fear taking control, Meursault feels displaced from his own body and hence can not respond how he normally would. All the essence of hope that was left in his entire body is now gone.

    8. Meursault’s sentence is “guilty of murder…premeditation…extenuating circumstances…” (p. 102) a much heavier sentence than he should have gotten if he had shown the necessary remorse for his crimes. His response to this is completely unlike him for he finally shows the emotion he needed but now it is far too late for that.

  6. MICHAEL V M says:

    1. What has happened to Meursault?

    - Meursault has been arrested and taken in for questioning at the police station. Meursault is being asked simple questions, while he believes it is only a matter of time before they discover his identity.

    2. Is he taking his circumstances seriously? Give an example.

    - Meursault is not taking his position seriously at all, it almost seems as if he is annoyed that he is in the circumstances he has placed himself in. With the examining magistrate, Meursault does not take him seriously in the first chapter. “At first I did not take him seriously.” -P63.

    3. What question does the attorney feel compelled to ask?

    - The attorney feels compelled to ask Meursault some personal questions, particularly about his mothers funeral. He feels compelled to ask whether Meursault felt any grief on that day. Meursault replies that “physical needs often distorted my feelings” and that he was very tired and could not properly establish himself well enough to display emotion.

    4. What explanation does Meursault give regarding his “nature”?

    - Meursault tells the attorney that the “by nature my physical needs often distorted my feelings.” This means that before Meursault displays emotion, he has to be in a perfect physical state without needs. Meursault believes that this is the way of nature, and this behavior is natural.

    5. How many times did Meursault fire his revolver?

    - Meursault fired the revolver 5 times. The first time he fires the gun he pauses for a long time, and then suddenly fires four more rounds into the Arab.

    6. The magistrate becomes frustrated with Meursault. What does he retrieve from his filing cabinet?

    - The examining magistrate retrieves from his filing cabinet a crucifix and holds and waves it infront Meursault. He then explains that Meursault must have a hard sould, because this act always makes other criminals cry. “Criminals have always wept at the sight of this symbol of suffering.”

    7. What’s the BIG question the magistrate finally asks Meursault?

    - The magistrate asks whether Meursault believes in God.

    8. Meursault says, “I thought about it for a minute and said that more than sorry I felt kind of annoyed.” Does Meursault have a conscience? Why or why not?

    - He does have a conscience, however he responds in a manner in which HE sees right. This quotation is follwed by “I felt he could not understand me.” And this is true – almost nobody understands the way Meursault thinks and feels.

    9. In your opinion, does Meursault feel complimented when referred to as Monsieur Antichrist?

    - Yes, he is finally being recognised as something different to himself.

  7. MICHAEL V M says:

    Chapter 2 – Part II
    1. Briefly describe Meursault’s prison cell. Is this what he had expected?

    - No. He was vaguely ‘waiting’ for something to happen. He makes his cell home and realises his life is at a standstill.

    2. Who is Meursault’s first visitor?

    - Marie. They let her come once and once only because she is not his wife.

    3. Describe Marie’s mood during the visit.

    – Marie’s mood seems happy, but a fake sort of happiness. She is clearly very disappointed at Meursault being in prison. She suggests that he should keep hoping. She never stops smiling and says that she wants to marry him.

    4. In a sense, what item was more difficult for Meursault to lose than his freedom?

    - Meursault feel’s extremely deprived of women and cigarettes. He claims that it is natural for wants. He soon comes to terms that it is part of the ‘punishment’ and he begins to deal with it.

    5. Meursault states that having “a memory” is “an advantage.” Briefly explain.

    - He says that a man who only had one day of freedom could cope in a prison for 100 years. Meursault feels that memories are the main use for ‘killing time.’

    6. The last sentences on p. 81 refer to Meursault’s mother’s funeral and to what nights in prison are like. In your opinion, is there a connection between the two?

    - Yes, that no one who is not dead can not speak of death, and that no one who has not been in a prison can not speak of prison nights. Meursault feels that both are bad things, and that there is no way out of either of them for him – he has to just cope.

  8. Will S says:

    Chapter 5

    1. Meursault feels that an execution is the only thing a man could really be interested in. Although Meursault feels this, his father felt ill at the execution that he witnessed, even though it was a murderer who’s death he saw taken away from him. “…father disgusted me for a time…now I understood, it was completely natural.” (p. 106) This seems a statement from a man who is not all completely together, although we know that Meursault simply has different values to other men.

    2. Meursault feels the problem with the guillotine is that it is a fine looking instrument that looks immaculate to the eye but is misleading in that it has one sole, simple purpose. He feels as if he is shaking hands with death in a rather pleasant matter but “…they killed you discreetly and rather shamefacedly but extremely accurately.” (p. 108) Meursault seems disgusted by this in that it is much like being shot in an alleyway and left there to rot as no one cares.

    3. It is ironic that Meursault got into this predicament through the fear of one blade and now is coming to face another. The irony is in the situation he is now put into “…I’d have to face the same situation anyway. Given you’ve got to die, it doesn’t matter how or when.” (p. 109) It is ironic that Meursault feels this way towards death when he could have had another twenty years of happiness ahead of him.

    4. Once it ‘sinks in’, Meursault feels only two things when he reflects on his situation. Firstly “…everybody knows life isn’t worth living.” and “It was still only me that was dying, whether it was know or in twenty years time.” (p. 109) Although his absurdist beliefs are reflected in this, he still stay stalwart in his views on life.

    5. Meursault, like in the paragraph above, agrees with the minority that life isn’t worth living. This could be part of his absurdist view, or simply accepting that he is going to die now and there is nothing he can do.

    6. Meursault, because of his absurdist beliefs and knowing that he feels that there is no ultimate truth in the universe. His view on religion is that it is a pointless exercise that should not have time wasted on it. “I had no need to see the chaplain.” (p. 110) most criminal would be to see the chaplain to that they could hopefully confess the last of their sins with some hope they may go to a better place. Meursault feels not this.

    7. Meursault feels no respect for the church or anyone related to it, as he can see them clinging onto a figure that will hopefully deliver them from death. “…I didn’t believe in God…he was talking about one of the very things that didn’t interest me.” (p. 111) Meursault will not even give the church the time of day nor he feels them then need to waste their breath on that which he is clearly no interested in.

    8. The priest say to Meursault that his ‘heart is blind’ for even at his judgement day for he still refuses to turn to God. This is Meursault’s blatant stubbornness and view on life that is entirely absurdist.

    9. He relates to his mother in the last paragraph when he realises that she felt liberated just before death and took on a fiance so that she felt that she could start again. When she was a home she felt as if she was a shadow of her former self, only when she wet into a home she got herself back.

    10. Meursault want to see a crowd boo him a he dies so that he can feel that he has taught someone a lesson through his death. He feels that he will finally see a real execution with the crowd and all, unfortunately it will be his own.

  9. nathan says:

    Chapter 1 – Part II
    1. What has happened to Meursault? He was arrested and questioned. Then he was taken to gaol.
    2. Is he taking his circumstances seriously? Give an example. No not really. He says, “I hadn’t thought about it.”
    3. What question does the attorney feel compelled to ask? The attorney asks if “I had felt grief on that “sad occasion.”
    4. What explanation does Meursault give regarding his “nature”?
    “By nature, my physical needs often distracted my feelings.”
    “I answered that, of recent years, I’d rather lost the habit of noting my feelings, and hardly knew what to answer.”
    5. How many times did Meursault fire his revolver? 5 times
    6. The magistrate becomes frustrated with Meursault. What does he retrieve from his filing cabinet? A “silver crucifix, which he was waving as he came back to the desk. “
    7. What’s the BIG question the magistrate finally asks Meursault?
    The big question is wether Meursault believes in God.
    8. Meursault says, “I thought about it for a minute and said that more than sorry I felt kind of annoyed.” Does Meursault have a conscience? Why or why not? Not at this stage in the book. I thinck that he doesn’t have a conscience yet as he’s been living in his physical world and not needing a conscience.
    9. In your opinion, does Meursault feel complimented when referred to as Monsieur Antichrist?
    No, he feels happy at the nick name

    Chapter 2 – Part II
    1. Briefly describe Meursault’s prison cell. Is this what he had expected? Dark grey with a bed of wire, and a window with bars.
    2. Who is Meursault’s first visitor? Marie
    3. Describe Marie’s mood during the visit. She was trying to be supportive “What about it? Are you all right,
    have you everything you want?”
    4. In a sense, what item was more difficult for Meursault to lose than his freedom? That he was removed from the physical world “thin dress. Its silky texture fascinated me, and I
    had a feeling that the hope she spoke of centered on it, somehow.” This quote shows that all his hope rests on this physical feeling.

    5. Meursault states that having “a memory” is “an advantage.” Briefly explain. Having a memory in gaol gives you the ability to pass the time very quickly. The memory he uses is of his bedroom. He remembers the smallest detail “I made a point of visualizing every
    piece of furniture, and each article upon or in it, and then every detail of each article, and finally the details of the details, so to speak: a tiny dent or incrustation, or a chipped edge, and the exact grain and color of the woodwork.”
    6. The last sentences on p. 81 refer to Meursault’s mother’s funeral and to what nights in prison are like. In your opinion, is there a connection between the two? There could be a connection with nights in prison and death because in both there “is no way out.”

    Chapter 3 – Part II
    1. What is Meursault’s first impression of the jury? Meursault sees them as “But somehow I didn’t see them as
    individuals.”
    2. What clues is the reader given to show that the Algerian court system is different than the U.S. Judicial System? Meursaults impressions of the cort give us an insight into the judical system.
    3. Who are the eight witnesses that will testify at Meursault’s trial?
    The witnesses were Raymond, “Masson, Salamano, the doorkeeper from the Home, old Pérez,” marie, celest and the woman of stone.
    4. A previous incident occurred between the caretaker and Meursault, which is briefly discussed during the trial. This leads to Camus’ title of the novel. What is the incident? The incident was the night vigil when Meursault smoked and slept and drank coffee.
    5. When Celeste, the fourth witness, is called to testify, how does he show support for Meursault? Celeste shows his support by explaining that “it was just a mishap”
    6. How does the prosecutor attempt to prove that Meursault has no conscience? He states that “this man buried his mother like a heartless criminal” he based this accusation on the facts he had already been given.
    7. What is the prosecutor implying when he questions Raymond? (refers to “chance” numerous times.)
    he refers to chance because he thinks that it wasn’t chance that lead Meursualt to kill the arab.

    8. Explain what Meursault means when he says, “it was back to my cell…sleep of the innocent. He states this because he can’ t be blamed for any deed during the time he is in prison.

    Chapter 4 – Part II
    1. Does Meursault feel like he has anything to say to defend himself? No
    2. In your opinion, does Meursault believe that his crime was premeditated? No, he belives that it was just a series of events that have come to pass. He didn’t do the deed deliberately but it wasn’t chance that forced him to do it.
    3. Meursault reveals the key to his character/personality. What is this? That he “couldn’t help regretting that the prosecutor was right. I didn’t regret what I had done.” This thought proves that Meursault is, to some extent, indifferent to what is occurring around him.
    4. What penalty does the prosecutor ask of the jury? Execution.
    5. Does Meursault have faith that his attorney will convince the jury of his innocence? No he doesn’t have faith and even goes to the length of calling his lawyer “ridiculous.”
    6. Imagism is used in “left me with the impression…. Was making me dizzy.” In your opinion, what is Meursault feeling at this point?
    Confusion and possibly a bit of fear.
    7. Why can’t Meursault return Marie’s smile in the courtroom?
    Meursault seems to have a problem with smiling back to marie because he seems to be “heart … locked”
    8. What is Meursault’s sentence? In your opinion, is his reaction normal? His sentence is execution. His reaction is normal for once in that he was stunned at it.

    Chapter 5 – Part II
    1. According to Meursault, why is witnessing an execution so important? Witnessing an execution is important because He might know of a way to escape the execution escaping from the implacable machinery of justice at the last moment,
    2. What is “the trouble with the guillotine”? The trouble with the guillotine is that there is “no chance for the condemned man”
    3. What is ironic about this when compared to how Meursault originally got into this predicament? It is ironic as Meursault got into this situation by pure chance.

    4. When Meursault’s situation finally “sinks in”, what are the two things he always thinks about?
    5. What is Meursault’s pessimistic view on life and living? That everyone dies its just a matter of when it occurs.
    6. Is Meursault a religious person? How do you know? No because he believes that there is nothing after death. Which is the key element in almost all religions, and all the religions he wold know would have this theme.
    7. Meursault shows no respect for religion or the priest. Give one example of this. He states his indifference to the belief of the Chaplin that every man is sentenced to death and rebirth (in heaven or in hell.)
    8. What does the priest mean when he says, “your heart is blind.” He means that he will never see the light.
    9. In the last few paragraphs, how does Meursault finally relate to Maman? He wonders how she would have felt when she was going to die.
    10. Why does Meursault wish that a large crowd of spectators greet him with cries of hate at his execution? Because he wants someone to be there for him and to him hate is as good as love.

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